SEARCH RESULTS

    Services (2)
    • Follow-up

      During a follow-up visit we go over how your herbal protocol is working, and make any needed changes. Add more SMART goals and see how your previous goals have created progress. Along with checking in on how your nutritional changes are making a different in your health. We will also talk about any struggles you may be having and make some changes to overcome those struggles.

    • Herbal, Nutrition, and Coaching

      When booking this service with me, I will work with you to create a personalized plan to help you meet your health goals. This will consist of setting SMART goals, nutritional advice and personal herbal protocol.

    View All
    Events (1)View All
    Blog Posts (4)
    • My Weight Loss Journey

      When I began my journey into herbal medicine a huge reason was to help people with weight loss. Obesity runs in my family and I wanted to know why and how I could change that, I still struggle daily with my own weight issues. So it is something that affects me on a personal level and I have great amounts of understanding for others struggling with their weight issues. I do believe we have a negative way to approaching this problem along with being set up to fail with our food industry. I am still on my journey but I have learned ton and now I want to share what I have learned and have a place to track my success to see if my theory is correct. Hopefully you can find some answers from my journey and the info I provide. Please remember we are all different so no one person fits into a perfect category, and what works for one person may not work for another. My goal is to lose weight in the most healthiest way possible and feed my body what it needs. So it begins day one! #weightloss #nutrition #holisitc #healthandwellness #herbsforweightloss

    • Truth About Carbs

      Not all carbohydrates are bad mater of fact they are your primary source of energy. You can think of carbohydrates like the gasoline you put in your car; they provide energy to move. Carbohydrates are found in many foods. You may think of these foods as “starches, sugars, or fibers.” Examples include: • Bread • Pasta • Cakes • Grains But many other foods contain carbohydrates, including: • Fruits • Vegetables • Dairy Chemically, carbohydrates are combinations of carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O). The basic formula is: CnH2nOn. All carbohydrates are made up of one or more molecules of simple sugars. Carbohydrates are classified by structure as follows: Monosaccharides Monosaccharides are one-molecule sugars. Those commonly found in food are: • Glucose (dextrose or blood sugar) • Fructose (levulose or fruit sugar • Galactose (occurs mainly in milk) Disaccharides Disaccharides are two monosaccharides linked together. Those common to food always contain at least one glucose molecule: • Sucrose (table sugar) = glucose + fructose • Lactose (milk sugar) = glucose + galactose • Maltose (malt sugar) = glucose + glucose Polysaccharides Polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates) are made up of simple sugars (monosaccharides) or their derivatives linked together in different ways. Those found in food include: • Starch, which is made up of several hundred glucose units linked together. • Dietary fiber, which consists of glucose, galactose, or other monosaccharides linked together in such a way that the long chains are indigestible. Foods High in Complex Carbohydrates Remember, complex carbohydrates are a complex chain of sugar units that the body breaks down slowly to provide energy. Complex carbohydrates are a vital part of a healthy diet, because they are assimilated more slowly, have a less dramatic effect on blood sugar levels, are less processed, and include a variety of other nutrients. Foods rich in complex carbohydrates tend to also contain fiber, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. Examples are whole grains (such as wheat, rice, corn, oats, barley, buckwheat, and millet), carbohydrate-rich vegetables (such as potatoes, corn, and peas), and legumes. Key points to remember: • The nutritional content of the grain will depend largely on the health of the soil and the conditions under which it is grown (this is true of all foods). • Whenever possible, buy organically grown foods. Eat whole grains as much as possible. Milling removes a major part of the nutrients, particularly the B vitamins and vitamin E. • Leave the skin on vegetables, such as potatoes, as most of the nutrients are just under the skin. • Refined simple sugars (monosaccharides and disaccharides) should be avoided as much as possible in the diet (such as table sugar, glucose, and processed foods containing sugar, like cakes, cookies, and sweets). • Refined complex carbohydrates should also be avoided (such as potato chips, white bread, and white pasta). • Select unrefined carbohydrates as often as possible and focus on complex carbohydrates. For sweets, select fresh fruit (organic if possible) and limited dairy (without sugar added). Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) For most people, between 40-60% of total calories should come from carbohydrates, preferably from complex carbohydrates (starches) and naturally occurring sugars. Complex carbohydrates provide calories, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Foods that are high in processed, refined simple sugars provide calories, but they have few nutritional benefits. It is wise to limit such sugars. To increase complex carbohydrates and healthy nutrients: • Eat more fruits and vegetables. • Eat more whole grains, rice, breads, and cereals. • Eat more legumes (beans, lentils, and dried peas). • Limit dairy: One cup of skim or low-fat milk. The Hypoglycemic Effect What happens if we eat many simple sugars or refined carbohydrates? • Absorption of simple carbohydrates (most usually sugar) is immediate. • Blood glucose levels rise quickly, causing the pancreas to release insulin. High-sugar foods, such as a cake, cookies, and candy, can all contribute to the hypoglycemic effect: • This gives a sudden burst of energy that is usually short-lived. • Insulin then causes the glucose to move out of the blood and into cells, causing lower than normal blood glucose levels. • This leads to a feeling of letdown with a craving for another dose of sugar. • A cycle of sugar craving is perpetuated. Sugar and other processed carbohydrates (such as white flour) contain no other nutrients and may mask the real need of the body for nourishment. The “seesaw” reaction that takes place when simple sugar is eaten is called the hypoglycemic effect. Over time, this strains the adrenal glands and weakens the body’s resistance to infection. If the diet is high in simple sugars it causes a lack of control of blood sugar levels. The constant release of insulin can cause the cells of the body to begin to ignore it, known as insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is linked with high blood sugar levels, high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and hypertension. It is also called metabolic syndrome or syndrome X. Insulin resistance greatly increases your risk of developing type II diabetes. Hypoglycemia may contribute to the exacerbation of many diseases, such as: Arthritis, asthma, digestive and weight problems, distended veins, hay fever, headaches (especially migraines), hyperactivity, lack of energy, low blood pressure, poor circulation, schizophrenia, skin problems, and even frequent colds. If these symptoms apply to you, consider following a hypoglycemic diet. Remember when eating carbohydrates, always choose complex organic is possible carbs. Complex carbohydrates will keep you fuller longer and your blood sugars balanced. Not all carbohydrates are bad they are your primary source of energy. You can think of carbohydrates like the gasoline you put in your car; they provide energy to move. Carbohydrates are found in many foods. You may think of these foods as “starches, sugars, or fibers.” Examples include: • Bread • Pasta • Cakes • Grains But many other foods contain carbohydrates, including: • Fruits • Vegetables • Dairy Chemically, carbohydrates are combinations of carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O). The basic formula is: CnH2nOn. All carbohydrates are made up of one or more molecules of simple sugars. Carbohydrates are classified by structure as follows: Monosaccharides Monosaccharides are one-molecule sugars. Those commonly found in food are: • Glucose (dextrose or blood sugar) • Fructose (levulose or fruit sugar • Galactose (occurs mainly in milk) Disaccharides Disaccharides are two monosaccharides linked together. Those common to food always contain at least one glucose molecule: • Sucrose (table sugar) = glucose + fructose • Lactose (milk sugar) = glucose + galactose • Maltose (malt sugar) = glucose + glucose Polysaccharides Polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates) are made up of simple sugars (monosaccharides) or their derivatives linked together in different ways. Those found in food include: • Starch, which is made up of several hundred glucose units linked together. • Dietary fiber, which consists of glucose, galactose, or other monosaccharides linked together in such a way that the long chains are indigestible. Foods High in Complex Carbohydrates Remember, complex carbohydrates are a complex chain of sugar units that the body breaks down slowly to provide energy. Complex carbohydrates are a vital part of a healthy diet, because they are assimilated more slowly, have a less dramatic effect on blood sugar levels, are less processed, and include a variety of other nutrients. Foods rich in complex carbohydrates tend to also contain fiber, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. Examples are whole grains (such as wheat, rice, corn, oats, barley, buckwheat, and millet), carbohydrate-rich vegetables (such as potatoes, corn, and peas), and legumes. Key points to remember: • The nutritional content of the grain will depend largely on the health of the soil and the conditions under which it is grown (this is true of all foods). • Whenever possible, buy organically grown foods. Eat whole grains as much as possible. Milling removes a major part of the nutrients, particularly the B vitamins and vitamin E. • Leave the skin on vegetables, such as potatoes, as most of the nutrients are just under the skin. • Refined simple sugars (monosaccharides and disaccharides) should be avoided as much as possible in the diet (such as table sugar, glucose, and processed foods containing sugar, like cakes, cookies, and sweets). • Refined complex carbohydrates should also be avoided (such as potato chips, white bread, and white pasta). • Select unrefined carbohydrates as often as possible and focus on complex carbohydrates. For sweets, select fresh fruit (organic if possible) and limited dairy (without sugar added). Recommended Daily Allowance13 For most people, between 40-60% of total calories should come from carbohydrates, preferably from complex carbohydrates (starches) and naturally occurring sugars. Complex carbohydrates provide calories, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Foods that are high in processed, refined simple sugars provide calories, but they have few nutritional benefits. It is wise to limit such sugars. To increase complex carbohydrates and healthy nutrients: • Eat more fruits and vegetables. • Eat more whole grains, rice, breads, and cereals. • Eat more legumes (beans, lentils, and dried peas). • Limit dairy: One cup of skim or low-fat milk. The Hypoglycemic Effect What happens if we eat many simple sugars or refined carbohydrates? • Absorption of simple carbohydrates (most usually sugar) is immediate. • Blood glucose levels rise quickly, causing the pancreas to release insulin. High-sugar foods, such as a cake, cookies, and candy, can all contribute to the hypoglycemic effect: • This gives a sudden burst of energy that is usually short-lived. • Insulin then causes the glucose to move out of the blood and into cells, causing lower than normal blood glucose levels. • This leads to a feeling of letdown with a craving for another dose of sugar. • A cycle of sugar craving is perpetuated. Sugar and other processed carbohydrates (such as white flour) contain no other nutrients and may mask the real need of the body for nourishment. The “seesaw” reaction that takes place when simple sugar is eaten is called the hypoglycemic effect. Over time, this strains the adrenal glands and weakens the body’s resistance to infection. If the diet is high in simple sugars it causes a lack of control of blood sugar levels. The constant release of insulin can cause the cells of the body to begin to ignore it, known as insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is linked with high blood sugar levels, high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and hypertension. It is also called metabolic syndrome or syndrome X. Insulin resistance greatly increases your risk of developing type II diabetes. Hypoglycemia may contribute to the exacerbation of many diseases, such as: Arthritis, asthma, digestive and weight problems, distended veins, hay fever, headaches (especially migraines), hyperactivity, lack of energy, low blood pressure, poor circulation, schizophrenia, skin problems, and even frequent colds. If these symptoms apply to you, consider following a hypoglycemic diet. Remember when eating carbohydrates, always choose complex organic is possible carbs. Complex carbohydrates will keep you fuller longer and your blood sugars balanced.

    View All
    Pages (6)
    • Let's Be Holistic | Herbal Medicine & More | Herbal Apothecary & Tea | Longview

      Your Health is Our Passion Let’s Be Holistic is a place for people to come and learn how to use herbal medicine safely LEARN MORE OFFERING Health Coaching, Nutritional Education, Herbal Medicine Let's be Holistic aims to help all of our clients live the healthiest lives they can. In order to help you reach your health goals, we use a variety of modalities: VISIT OUR SHOP Come Visit Our Fully-Stocked Apothecary Loose Bulk Teas, Tea Accessories, Spices, Aromatherapy Sprays & Hemp CBD Extract NEW HOURS: 12 PM - 4 PM, TUESDAY - SATURDAY High-risk shopping appointments available. Consulting appointments through zoom. APPOINTMENTS DIRECTIONS INSIDE THE SHOP NUTRITIONAL EDUCATION Healthy Living "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" Hippocrates. Without good nutrition, we can never have full health. Making simple changes in our diet can have a huge impact on how we feel. To have holistic health the body must be supplied with fresh nutrients. LEARN MORE HEALTH COACHING Health Begins Here Coaching is client-driven, and I am just the guiding tool. This is where most people start their health journey. Through this process, I will help you gain healthy sustainable behavior changes. This is done by challenging you to listen to your inner wisdom, values, and using those to set goals that turn into positive actions. LEARN MORE HERBAL MEDICINE Healthy Support Herbal medicine has been around for centuries and is making a come-back as a great tool to help with healing and to support long-term health. Herbs can be used in many different forms and can be one of your best allies in the journey towards holistic health. LEARN MORE BUY THROUGH FULLSCRIPT SHOP ONLINE Featured Products Raspberry Rose Quick View Hummingbird Simple Syrup Price $16.00 Organic Quick View Strawberry Black TEA Price $16.00 Salted Honey Cardamon Quick View Golden Age Simply Syurp Price $16.00 Strawberry Basil Quick View Meadowland Simple Syrup Price $16.00 Marion Berry Black Pepper Quick View Oregon Black Bird Simple Syrup Price $16.00 Raspberry Rose Quick View Hummingbird Simple Syrup Price $16.00 Organic Quick View Strawberry Black TEA Price $16.00 Salted Honey Cardamon Quick View Golden Age Simply Syurp Price $16.00 Strawberry Basil Quick View Meadowland Simple Syrup Price $16.00 Marion Berry Black Pepper Quick View Oregon Black Bird Simple Syrup Price $16.00 Raspberry Rose Quick View Hummingbird Simple Syrup Price $16.00 Organic Quick View Strawberry Black TEA Price $16.00 Salted Honey Cardamon Quick View Golden Age Simply Syurp Price $16.00 Strawberry Basil Quick View Meadowland Simple Syrup Price $16.00 Stay updated on the latest tips, products and promos > Thanks for joining our mailing list. Look out for tips and promos in your inbox! READ Latest Posts Hear what they're saying about us: “Let's Be Holistic has some of the most flavorful teas I've ever tasted! I have not been let down! They have fantastic tea, wonderful and friendly Customer service. It is a lovely place all around, plus It's not just a tea shop, they have a lot of other things to address pretty much whatever issue is concerning to you. And with Shannon's extensive knowledge you can't go wrong! Need a custom blend? No problem, Shannon makes those too!” Evelyna Castro READ MORE FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM

    • Women's Health | Let's Be Holistic

      WOMEN'S HEALTH On Sale Quick View Black Cohosh Regular Price $16.95 Sale Price $13.56 On Sale Quick View Chaste Tree Regular Price $12.95 Sale Price $10.36 1

    • Loose Herbs | Let's Be Holistic

      LOOSE HERBS Filter by Properties All Immune Health Digestive Health Metabolic Health Quick View PNW Tisane - 2 ounces Pick up Only Price $10.00 Quick View Organic Elecampane Root C/S 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Cinnamon Chips - 4 ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Organic Horsetail - 4 ounces Price $12.00 Quick View St. John's Wort - 4 ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Organic Elder Flowers - 4 ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Organic Red Raspberry - 4 ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Organic Wormwood - 4 ounces Price $12.00 Quick View 4 ounces Spearmint Price $12.00 Quick View Hawthorn - 4 ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Star Anise 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Dandelion Root 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Dandelion Leaf 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Red Rose petals 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Lavender 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Meadowsweet 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Cleavers 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Nettles 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Skullcap 4 - ounces Price $12.00 Quick View Linden flower and leaf 4 - ounces Price $12.00 1 2

    View All
Let's Be Holistic

Herbal Medicine and More

CONTACT US

The Merk - Suite 110

1339 Commerce

Longview, WA 98632

©2020 Let's Be Holistic Wellness Coaching with Shannon Mesneak