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  • Truth About Carbs

    Not all carbohydrates are bad mater of fact they are your primary source of energy. You can think of carbohydrates like the gasoline you put in your car; they provide energy to move. Carbohydrates are found in many foods. You may think of these foods as “starches, sugars, or fibers.” Examples include: • Bread • Pasta • Cakes • Grains But many other foods contain carbohydrates, including: • Fruits • Vegetables • Dairy Chemically, carbohydrates are combinations of carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O). The basic formula is: CnH2nOn. All carbohydrates are made up of one or more molecules of simple sugars. Carbohydrates are classified by structure as follows: Monosaccharides Monosaccharides are one-molecule sugars. Those commonly found in food are: • Glucose (dextrose or blood sugar) • Fructose (levulose or fruit sugar • Galactose (occurs mainly in milk) Disaccharides Disaccharides are two monosaccharides linked together. Those common to food always contain at least one glucose molecule: • Sucrose (table sugar) = glucose + fructose • Lactose (milk sugar) = glucose + galactose • Maltose (malt sugar) = glucose + glucose Polysaccharides Polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates) are made up of simple sugars (monosaccharides) or their derivatives linked together in different ways. Those found in food include: • Starch, which is made up of several hundred glucose units linked together. • Dietary fiber, which consists of glucose, galactose, or other monosaccharides linked together in such a way that the long chains are indigestible. Foods High in Complex Carbohydrates Remember, complex carbohydrates are a complex chain of sugar units that the body breaks down slowly to provide energy. Complex carbohydrates are a vital part of a healthy diet, because they are assimilated more slowly, have a less dramatic effect on blood sugar levels, are less processed, and include a variety of other nutrients. Foods rich in complex carbohydrates tend to also contain fiber, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. Examples are whole grains (such as wheat, rice, corn, oats, barley, buckwheat, and millet), carbohydrate-rich vegetables (such as potatoes, corn, and peas), and legumes. Key points to remember: • The nutritional content of the grain will depend largely on the health of the soil and the conditions under which it is grown (this is true of all foods). • Whenever possible, buy organically grown foods. Eat whole grains as much as possible. Milling removes a major part of the nutrients, particularly the B vitamins and vitamin E. • Leave the skin on vegetables, such as potatoes, as most of the nutrients are just under the skin. • Refined simple sugars (monosaccharides and disaccharides) should be avoided as much as possible in the diet (such as table sugar, glucose, and processed foods containing sugar, like cakes, cookies, and sweets). • Refined complex carbohydrates should also be avoided (such as potato chips, white bread, and white pasta). • Select unrefined carbohydrates as often as possible and focus on complex carbohydrates. For sweets, select fresh fruit (organic if possible) and limited dairy (without sugar added). Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) For most people, between 40-60% of total calories should come from carbohydrates, preferably from complex carbohydrates (starches) and naturally occurring sugars. Complex carbohydrates provide calories, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Foods that are high in processed, refined simple sugars provide calories, but they have few nutritional benefits. It is wise to limit such sugars. To increase complex carbohydrates and healthy nutrients: • Eat more fruits and vegetables. • Eat more whole grains, rice, breads, and cereals. • Eat more legumes (beans, lentils, and dried peas). • Limit dairy: One cup of skim or low-fat milk. The Hypoglycemic Effect What happens if we eat many simple sugars or refined carbohydrates? • Absorption of simple carbohydrates (most usually sugar) is immediate. • Blood glucose levels rise quickly, causing the pancreas to release insulin. High-sugar foods, such as a cake, cookies, and candy, can all contribute to the hypoglycemic effect: • This gives a sudden burst of energy that is usually short-lived. • Insulin then causes the glucose to move out of the blood and into cells, causing lower than normal blood glucose levels. • This leads to a feeling of letdown with a craving for another dose of sugar. • A cycle of sugar craving is perpetuated. Sugar and other processed carbohydrates (such as white flour) contain no other nutrients and may mask the real need of the body for nourishment. The “seesaw” reaction that takes place when simple sugar is eaten is called the hypoglycemic effect. Over time, this strains the adrenal glands and weakens the body’s resistance to infection. If the diet is high in simple sugars it causes a lack of control of blood sugar levels. The constant release of insulin can cause the cells of the body to begin to ignore it, known as insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is linked with high blood sugar levels, high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and hypertension. It is also called metabolic syndrome or syndrome X. Insulin resistance greatly increases your risk of developing type II diabetes. Hypoglycemia may contribute to the exacerbation of many diseases, such as: Arthritis, asthma, digestive and weight problems, distended veins, hay fever, headaches (especially migraines), hyperactivity, lack of energy, low blood pressure, poor circulation, schizophrenia, skin problems, and even frequent colds. If these symptoms apply to you, consider following a hypoglycemic diet. Remember when eating carbohydrates, always choose complex organic is possible carbs. Complex carbohydrates will keep you fuller longer and your blood sugars balanced. Not all carbohydrates are bad they are your primary source of energy. You can think of carbohydrates like the gasoline you put in your car; they provide energy to move. Carbohydrates are found in many foods. You may think of these foods as “starches, sugars, or fibers.” Examples include: • Bread • Pasta • Cakes • Grains But many other foods contain carbohydrates, including: • Fruits • Vegetables • Dairy Chemically, carbohydrates are combinations of carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O). The basic formula is: CnH2nOn. All carbohydrates are made up of one or more molecules of simple sugars. Carbohydrates are classified by structure as follows: Monosaccharides Monosaccharides are one-molecule sugars. Those commonly found in food are: • Glucose (dextrose or blood sugar) • Fructose (levulose or fruit sugar • Galactose (occurs mainly in milk) Disaccharides Disaccharides are two monosaccharides linked together. Those common to food always contain at least one glucose molecule: • Sucrose (table sugar) = glucose + fructose • Lactose (milk sugar) = glucose + galactose • Maltose (malt sugar) = glucose + glucose Polysaccharides Polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates) are made up of simple sugars (monosaccharides) or their derivatives linked together in different ways. Those found in food include: • Starch, which is made up of several hundred glucose units linked together. • Dietary fiber, which consists of glucose, galactose, or other monosaccharides linked together in such a way that the long chains are indigestible. Foods High in Complex Carbohydrates Remember, complex carbohydrates are a complex chain of sugar units that the body breaks down slowly to provide energy. Complex carbohydrates are a vital part of a healthy diet, because they are assimilated more slowly, have a less dramatic effect on blood sugar levels, are less processed, and include a variety of other nutrients. Foods rich in complex carbohydrates tend to also contain fiber, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. Examples are whole grains (such as wheat, rice, corn, oats, barley, buckwheat, and millet), carbohydrate-rich vegetables (such as potatoes, corn, and peas), and legumes. Key points to remember: • The nutritional content of the grain will depend largely on the health of the soil and the conditions under which it is grown (this is true of all foods). • Whenever possible, buy organically grown foods. Eat whole grains as much as possible. Milling removes a major part of the nutrients, particularly the B vitamins and vitamin E. • Leave the skin on vegetables, such as potatoes, as most of the nutrients are just under the skin. • Refined simple sugars (monosaccharides and disaccharides) should be avoided as much as possible in the diet (such as table sugar, glucose, and processed foods containing sugar, like cakes, cookies, and sweets). • Refined complex carbohydrates should also be avoided (such as potato chips, white bread, and white pasta). • Select unrefined carbohydrates as often as possible and focus on complex carbohydrates. For sweets, select fresh fruit (organic if possible) and limited dairy (without sugar added). Recommended Daily Allowance13 For most people, between 40-60% of total calories should come from carbohydrates, preferably from complex carbohydrates (starches) and naturally occurring sugars. Complex carbohydrates provide calories, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Foods that are high in processed, refined simple sugars provide calories, but they have few nutritional benefits. It is wise to limit such sugars. To increase complex carbohydrates and healthy nutrients: • Eat more fruits and vegetables. • Eat more whole grains, rice, breads, and cereals. • Eat more legumes (beans, lentils, and dried peas). • Limit dairy: One cup of skim or low-fat milk. The Hypoglycemic Effect What happens if we eat many simple sugars or refined carbohydrates? • Absorption of simple carbohydrates (most usually sugar) is immediate. • Blood glucose levels rise quickly, causing the pancreas to release insulin. High-sugar foods, such as a cake, cookies, and candy, can all contribute to the hypoglycemic effect: • This gives a sudden burst of energy that is usually short-lived. • Insulin then causes the glucose to move out of the blood and into cells, causing lower than normal blood glucose levels. • This leads to a feeling of letdown with a craving for another dose of sugar. • A cycle of sugar craving is perpetuated. Sugar and other processed carbohydrates (such as white flour) contain no other nutrients and may mask the real need of the body for nourishment. The “seesaw” reaction that takes place when simple sugar is eaten is called the hypoglycemic effect. Over time, this strains the adrenal glands and weakens the body’s resistance to infection. If the diet is high in simple sugars it causes a lack of control of blood sugar levels. The constant release of insulin can cause the cells of the body to begin to ignore it, known as insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is linked with high blood sugar levels, high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and hypertension. It is also called metabolic syndrome or syndrome X. Insulin resistance greatly increases your risk of developing type II diabetes. Hypoglycemia may contribute to the exacerbation of many diseases, such as: Arthritis, asthma, digestive and weight problems, distended veins, hay fever, headaches (especially migraines), hyperactivity, lack of energy, low blood pressure, poor circulation, schizophrenia, skin problems, and even frequent colds. If these symptoms apply to you, consider following a hypoglycemic diet. Remember when eating carbohydrates, always choose complex organic is possible carbs. Complex carbohydrates will keep you fuller longer and your blood sugars balanced.

  • Nutrition for Hormones

    Almost all women at some point in their lives have experienced what it feels like to have their hormones go out of balance. I certainly have had ongoing issues with hormones. I was diagnosed 8 years ago with PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome). And let me tell you it took a great deal of time to find out what really was the issue, so much so that I had a partial hysterectomy. For the first few years, after my diagnosis, I did nothing to change my situation after going through a surgery with no relief I wasn't excited to jump back in. I wish I had not made that decision! Things only got worse and my life got even more difficult. My stress, anxiety, and my overall ability to deal with life was getting harder and harder. I had no sex drive, was tired all the time, ovarian cysts every few months that were so painful. It was at this point I decided enough is enough I could no longer live like this! So I began my journey to figure out how or what could I do to feel better. It has been a very long journey, one that even took me back to school. I am so grateful that I made that decision and that now I am able to share what I have learned with other women. I still struggle but I am at least heading in the right direction. Nutrition is super important when it comes to women and hormones, we make our hormones from fat. So eating a diet of healthy fats is super important. One simple way you can begin to balance your hormones with good fats is to do seed cycling. This is a great trick for all women including those that don't have any hormone issues now. Down the road, it could protect you from having issues. It's super easy and doesn't require a lot of time. The theory is that you cycle seeds with your menstrual cycle beginning either on the first day of your period or for those who don't have a period on the new moon, it really is up to you. There are natural phytochemicals in the seeds that support the hormones and nourish your body at the appropriate phase of your cycle at the appropriate time. From the new moon, or first-day fo your cycle, you will add 1 tsp to 1 tbsp ground flax(buy whole flax seeds and grind daily it the best)chia, and pumpkin seeds to your daily diet. You may also choose to add Evening primrose oil during this phase. From the full moon, or on the 14th day of your cycle you will switch your seeds to 1 tsp to 1 tbsp of ground sesame and sunflower seeds. At this point, you may choose to switch from using Evening primrose oil to an algae oil ( I prefer Nordic naturals Algae Omega). I choose algae oil because I hate burping up fish oil and nowadays it is getting harder and harder to find fish that is not full of mercy or microplastics making good quality fish oils more expensive. The awesome thing about doing Seed Cycling is your using food as medicine, and it is unlikely to cause you harm. A quick tip is to add your seeds to a smoothie, salad, or pasta dish. You will want to give at least three months for optimum results. So be sure to give it three months before giving up. If you are experiencing severe symptoms, please see your doctor or qualified practitioner.

  • My Weight Loss Journey

    When I began my journey into herbal medicine a huge reason was to help people with weight loss. Obesity runs in my family and I wanted to know why and how I could change that, I still struggle daily with my own weight issues. So it is something that affects me on a personal level and I have great amounts of understanding for others struggling with their weight issues. I do believe we have a negative way to approaching this problem along with being set up to fail with our food industry. I am still on my journey but I have learned ton and now I want to share what I have learned and have a place to track my success to see if my theory is correct. Hopefully you can find some answers from my journey and the info I provide. Please remember we are all different so no one person fits into a perfect category, and what works for one person may not work for another. My goal is to lose weight in the most healthiest way possible and feed my body what it needs. So it begins day one! #weightloss #nutrition #holisitc #healthandwellness #herbsforweightloss

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